Boy’s birthday reproductive rights round-up

abortion-poll

On my older son’s birthday, I feel like it is only appropriate to post a link round-up with items of reproductive rights interest. Why? Well, when I think of reproductive rights, I think of what a fierce dedication and sense of wonder I have toward being a parent. I don’t want anyone to parent a sacred, important human being unless they really, really are up to the challenge. I don’t even want anyone to babysit if they are forced or pressured to.

So, in honor of parenting by choice, here are some links and stuff for your reading and viewing pleasure:
According to this poll, the vast majority of people in our country and most others do not think abortion should become illegal, or even legally restricted. So, why is this considered to be such a third rail, controversial topic? Only 8% of Americans think abortion should be discouraged by punitive methods. Let’s move the dialogue on past these extremists, finally, please!

From Sociological Images: Seeing is Believing.

Here is a great spot about why the fertilized egg = human argument hurts all pregnant women, not just women who want an abortion. Reproductive rights are intertwined, indeed.

And finally, the New England Journal of Medicine has a wonderful opinion piece up about the recent conscience clause rule and its proposed rescission. It ties in well with my discussions with Jill on the patient as customer and refusal of care.

(H/t to Our Bodies, Our Blog)

2 Comments

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2 responses to “Boy’s birthday reproductive rights round-up

  1. =)

    Happy momiversary!

  2. Great graph – someone (!) should help overlay this with actual rates of abortion in each country & availability of easy birth control to see how public opinion shapes individual decisions….

    oh, and India and China have some additional issues – the abortion rights debate there is two-sided, because of the extremely high rate of female foeticide. So all those people suggesting punitive enforcement against abortion in India are actually *for* women’s rights to, literally, exist and they’re reacting to local realities (not necessarily in the best possible way!).

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