Crazy day in gross

Well, I finally thought I had grown accustomed to gross anatomy. Today we hemisected the pelvis. What that means is, we sawed one of the legs off, from about the belly button and lower spine down.

“Get her in the lithotomy position,” said one of the professors. This is one of the professors I like, who always has disgusting stains around the pockets of his white coat and is way too eager to touch the bodies with his own bare skin, either above his gloves on his arm or through the holes in his gloves that he invariably rips.

So, he guides us to jack our cadavers legs up, way way up. Perpindicular to the body. Ummm, the lithotomy position is the feet in stirrups position, kind of the obstetrical equivalent of the missionary position. As I was holding the leg straight up in the air as he sawed away with a hacksaw, I thought “I am so happy you are not my gynecologist!”

Then I got to see old feces scraped out of the sigmoid colon, saw countless legs go by as classmates carried them to rinse the rest of the feces out in the sinks, and watched them come back to the tables, dripping. *shudder* Finally, at the end of the lab I got to wash cadaver feces out of our hacksaw. Niiiiice.

But, dissecting the female pelvis was fun in between. I was bummed to find out our cadaver had no uterus. I had a feeling she wouldn’t from the beginning. Considering her age, and that hysterectomies were the gallbladder removal of the eighties, I figured they got rid of that unnecessary organ on her as they did to so many other women her age. She did have a lovely ovary (just one) and fallopian tube.

3 Comments

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3 responses to “Crazy day in gross

  1. Orb

    Our cadaver had had a hysterectomy as well. We were suprised at how many operations she had undergone.

    ha… I listed them all out and then deleted them. (I don’t want to be breaking any hipaa rules). I’ll just say her greater and lesser omentums were not very mobile!

  2. Yeah, I am always careful how much I mention about gross – I don’t want to offend or break any confidentiality agreements. Our cadaver is riddled with cancer. Interesting, but it mean that she is not a good example for a lot of the structures in the thorax and abdomen.

  3. Orb

    I know what you mean. Our cadaver was the “squint and try to imagine the structure” variety.

    One of the cadavers in our room was a beautifully muscular man. Whenever we would look at him, our lab table would get cadaver envy.

    I’m glad anatomy is over for us! I’m studying for a biochem exam right now… it’s much more enjoyable, and I can actually eat while I study!

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